Smart Meters Dangers well known

The clever naming of Smart Meter burns Man to DeathSmart Meters fails to prove that they are smart or even safe.  Smart meter dangers are well known.  A mass body of scientific evidence shows increases in cancer and other adverse health effects in people exposed to pulsed radio frequency/microwave radiation such as that emitted by smart meters.  These meters are also known to cause fires.

 

 

Smart Meters emit Dangerous Microwave Radiation

The website www.bioinitiative.org documents more than 2,000 research studies showing the negative health effects of radio frequency/microwave and electromagnetic radiation.  Fifty two scientists and physicians from around the world have signed a document refuting the safety of so-called “Smart” meters.  The American Academy of Environmental Medicine has called for a moratorium on smart meters in homes and schools based on the documented health hazards of radio frequency/microwave radiation of smart meters. The World Health Organization has categorized radio frequency radiation as a Class 2B carcinogen. Did anyone ever ask you if it was ok to put something that causes cancer on your house and radiate you with it all day?

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BP’s Corexit poisons all

The Government Bio HazardAccountability Project  (GAP) reports that whistleblowers throughout the Gulf of Mexico have revealed that British Petroleum’s use of Corexit (which is banned in BP’s home country, England) has caused devastating, long-term health effects for human beings and decimated ocean life. (Visit whistleblower.org)

GAP writes: “Our report – relying on over 25 whistleblowers from the region – concludes that the use of dispersant by BP and the federal government actually made the long-term effects of the spill on the Gulf and its residents worse, creating environmental and public health hazards on an incomprehensible scale.”

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Wells Fargo scams Customers

wells-fargoWells Fargo scams Customers. Wells Fargo was ordered by a federal judge in May 2013 to pay $203 million for a checking scam. The class action case accused Wells Fargo of imposing excessive overdraft fees and of misleading its customers in order to collect on more overdrafts. The bank stands accused of processing purchases from the largest to the smallest rather than in chronological order in order to trigger more overdraft fees, which were excessive anyway, at $25-$35 a pop.

Lawyer Richard McCune, who represented about one million current and former Wells Fargo customers in California, said, “Wells Fargo was profiting off its most vulnerable customers, and this (decision) holds the banks accountable.”

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NRDC fights Pebble Mine

The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) announced today that thanks to donations from thousands of concerned supporters, a hard-hitting ad against the Pebble Mine – featuring NRDC Trustee Robert Redford – just appeared in The Washington Post. The NRDC is now calling for more support to run the ad in more media outlets to build pressure on President Obama to stop the disastrous project.

The ad asks President Obama to prevent the destruction of Alaska’s spectacular Bristol Bay by stopping the disastrous Pebble Mine.

The ad had an impact inside Washington, according to NRDC sources at the White House, in the EPA and on Capitol Hill.

According to NRDC, “The mining giants have launched a blitz of disinformation, whitewashing their monstrous project and attacking the EPA. They’re hoping to freeze the White House into inaction.”

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Sandy smashes East Coast

Hurricane Sandy smashed the East Coast with 80 mph winds and record storm surges on Oct. 29, 2012. The storm killed more than 90 people as it destroyed homes and businesses and left millions without power. Nearly a week later, residents are still reeling from Sandy’s devastation.

Widespread power outages and subway shutdowns may make Sandy the second most expensive storm in U.S. history after Hurricane Katrina.

Insurance adviser Eqecat said last week that damage from the superstorm will likely be far worse than it previously predicted, as Sandy hit the country’s most densely populated area. The firm doubled its previous damage estimate, now believing that Sandy may have caused between $30 billion and $50 billion in economic losses.  The total destruction includes property damage, lost business and extra living expenses. The cost to insurance companies could run as low as $10 billion and as high as $20 billion.

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Ford loses trademark case

Ford lost a case Ford_logo2in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals yesterday when the court ruled that a Montgomery, Texas printer did not violate any law in printing the Ford logo for clients such as Ford dealers, used car dealers or anyone else using the Ford logo under standard fair use policies.  The printer, George Atkinson, sued Ford after receiving a demand letter for $5,000 after he printed the Ford logo for a client. Mr. Atkinson sued Ford for unfair business practices and interference with third party contracts.

Mr. Atkinson says Ford has sent out thousands of letters to commercial printers, sign companies, advertising products companies and anyone else Ford finds using an image of the Ford logo for any reason, claiming users are infringing by using the Ford logo/trademark without Ford’s approval. Ford claims in the letters and in court that it has the right to approve the copy of the logo any printer uses. Ford also claims in the letters that any use not authorized by Ford amounts to counterfeiting. The letters all contain a standard $5000 demand for damages. The Ford demand letters also claim – falsely, according to Mr. Atkinson and to Ford’s OWN documents – that dealers are, by contract, allowed to use only six  sources which Ford has “authorized” for the purpose.

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SNAP, the Bishops and a Lesson in Ecclesiology

Thomas Doyle, J.C.D.

SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, came into existence in 1989, just five years after national attention was first focused on sexual molestation of minors by Catholic Clergy. The founder, Barbara Blaine, is a survivor of abuse. The national director, David Clohessy is also a survivor. SNAP came into existence because the institutional Church, i.e., the bishops, could not and would not do anything to help the victims of the priests they were supposed to supervise. Realizing that they would have to help themselves, Barbara and the original members started what has become the oldest and most effective advocacy and help group for the countless victims of clergy abuse throughout the U.S. in Europe as well. Over the years since its existence SNAP has done what the institutional Church should have done: it offered understanding, support, solace and above all, hope for anyone who called upon it. SNAP is not a sophisticated organization with a well-oiled and financed bureaucracy. It has always been focused on providing support for victims, giving them the encouragement to begin to heal from the devastation of abuse and giving them hope, knowing they are not alone.

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