GM Recall Cases Mount and Change

As GM recallGM Logo cases mount and change, attorneys for General Motors announced this week that the car maker will pay injury claims for people who incurred medical expenses within 48 hours of having been injured by cars which had a defective ignition switch. The defective switch can inadvertently cut out and lead to a loss of power, which can then lead to the failure of power steering and brakes, which can in turn lead to an accident made worse by the failure of airbags, which can also occur because of the loss of power.

The 48-hour treatment limit alters the original GM settlement agreement announced on June 30, 2014. At that time, inclusion in the GM settlement required, at a minimum, that a person had to have visited the ER or suffered hospitalization immediately following the failure of an airbag to deploy because of a defective ignition switch.

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GM recalls 7.6 Million more Cars for Ignition Switch

General Motors announced on GM LogoJune 30, 2014 that it will conduct six additional safety recalls which involve some 7.6 million vehicles from model years 1997 to 2014.

This latest GM Recall News was so shocking that it briefly halted trading of the company’s shares. General Motors announced that in order to pay for the recall costs, it will take a $1.2 billion charge in the second quarter. That represents a huge increase over the $700 million charge the company had previously projected to take for earlier recalls.

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GM Recall Case delayed by NHTSA

The GM recall caseGM Logo delayed by NHTSA caution begins with the history of the regulatory agency. Though the story behind the General Motors recall in March 2014 of 1.3 million cars for power-steering system problems actually began some ten years ago, the slow-motion action which guided the recall really began back with NHTSA legal issues in the 1970s.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) was aware for years that GM had received thousands of complaints over power steering problems in Saturn Ions; but because of previous developments, the agency was powerless to take any definitive action until it could secure statistics which could legally back the growing numbers of anecdotal accounts. It is a problem not unlike adverse events reported to the FDA for a given drug, another government agency which will not take action until it possesses enough long-term studies and statistics to demonstrate some threshold level of increased risk.

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Judge accepts $2.9 Million Fracking Case Verdict

The judge presiding over fracking glassa toxic emissions case involving fracking in Texas has accepted a jury verdict which awarded $2.9 million to the Parr family of Weiss County. The Parrs sued Aruba Petroleum for emissions which made them sick.

Judge Mark Greenberg issued a one-page ruling on June 19 that denied Aruba’s motion to reject the jury’s verdict which came in Greenberg’s court in April 2014. Aruba’s arguments which were rejected by Greenberg included the company’s claim that the Parr family failed to prove Aruba emissions made them sick.

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Fracked Farmer dies of Rare Brain Cancer

A fracked farmer Terry Greenwood Blog Picturedied of a rare brain cancer on Sunday, June 8, 2014 in Pennsylvania. Harassed, threatened and poisoned by frackers for the last seven years of his life, Terry Greenwood was 66.

“It killed the cattle, and it’ll kill the people next.”  – Terry Greenwood on Fracking

Landowner’s Rights Trampled

A fracking company representative sat in Mr. Greenwood’s kitchen in 2007 and asked him if the company could frack for natural gas on his land. The state of law being what it is, Mr. Greenwood didn’t have the legal “right” to refuse (the country having become what it is – a place where corporations pillage us as they did Vietnam, Iraq, Ecuador, and a hundred other places); but he told the company man he would fight for his property, for his rights. The company man told him he didn’t stand a chance, that he didn’t have enough money to fight the fracking giant protected by Dick Cheney’s Halliburton loophole – which exempts frackers from any meaningful regulation as well as the clean water act. The fracking man knew his act was sanctioned and promoted by local, state and national government “Yes” men whose jobs depend on genuflecting to the money.

Fracking contaminates Ground Water

A month later, the drilling had contaminated the well from which Mr. Greenwood had drawn water for himself, his pets and his cattle for the previous 20 years. The fracker then threw him a bone – not out of the goodness of its little black heart, but at the behest of county “regulators” (Read: Industry lapdogs). It drilled five water wells, none of which produced drinkable water.

Fracking Spill Kill – A Farmer’s Luck

After a fracking spill the next year, ten of 18 calves born on Mr. Greenwood’s property were stillborn. One that survived was born blind, another with a cleft palate. The next Spring, Mr. Greenwood’s lone bull, which would normally sire at least nine calves a year, became sterile. The Department of Energy told Mr. Greenwood, “That’s a farmer’s luck.”

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Exxon CEO joins a Fracking Lawsuit

An Exxon CEO joins Exxon CEOa Fracking Lawsuit – that’s news you don’t read every day. “Do unto others, then cut out,” is the Malthusian motto for most natural gas frackers. It’s fun to frack somebody else’s property, but maybe not so much when someone fracks your own. Witness ExxonMobil’s CEO Rex Tillerson. A longtime pro-fracking cheerleader who, like most corporate heroes, likes to rail against regulation of any kind, Mr. Tillerson objects to fracking only when it touches him personally. The Wall Street Journal reported in February 2014 that Mr. Tillerson joined a lawsuit to stop a fracking supply company from building a tower that could hurt the Exxon head’s $5 Million property values.  The tower is meant to supply water to a nearby fracking site.

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Texas Woman sues GM for Tragic Crash

A Houston-area woman GM Logowho lost her legs and broke her neck in a December auto crash filed suit against General Motors on April 8.  Thirty-year-old Tiffany Adams claims her GM car’s faulty ignition switch caused her accident.

Ms. Adams filed her suit in Texas’ 189th State District Court. The suit names as responsible parties General Motors, Delphi Automotive, which manufactured the ignition switch, and Ms. Adams’ Houston car dealer, Mac Haik Auto Direct.

The lawsuit states that the component required to fix the ignition-switch defect costs between two and five dollars, according to Delphi.

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First Fracking Trial in Texas

DALLAS — The first fracking Zoloft lawsuittrial in Texas opens in Dallas today. Bob and Lisa Parr of Wise County are suing Aruba Petroleum for property and personal damages which the couple claims they have suffered as a result of Aruba’s fracking operations. The Parr property was surrounded by natural gas frackers in 2009. The Parrs charge that frackers have so polluted their air and water as to destroy their right to peacefully enjoy their home and property and properly care for their pets and livestock, some of whom have died as a result of the fracking pollution, according to the complaint against Plano, Texas-based Aruba Petroleum.

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Judges Guilty of Bribery

Judges GuiltyZoloft lawsuit of violating their sworn duty do not have the right to sit on the bench in any court in judgement of anyone, whether Supreme Court judges or those in charge of lesser courts. The cozy relationship some U.S. Supreme Court judges have with corporate big shots may not make those judges guilty of bribery, of accepting bribes, but sometimes the activity can grow so egregious it is impossible not to prosecute judges, and not only take them off the bench, but send them to jail.

U.S. Supreme Court judges Antoin Scalia and Clarence Thomas have violated their sworn duty to avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest (attending Koch brothers’-sponsored events, among other questionable activities); but even their scandalous ethical shortcomings pale compared to those of former barrister Mark Ciavarella. A former Pennsylvania juvenile court judge, Ciavarella was sentenced to 28 years in prison for taking bribes to send juveniles to a for-profit detention facility. Put on your puke bib for this one.

Prosecutors said that Ciavarella accepted nearly $1 million from a developer who built the prison facility.

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Wireless experiment violates Nuremberg Treaty

Scientist Barry Trower has announced that the telecommunications industry, with the cooperation of governments around the world, is violating the Nuremberg treaty by allowing human experimentation on a global scale.

Signed by all the nations of the world, the Nuremberg Treaty forbids human experimentation. The treaty states that no human being will be experimented upon without his or her consent, and before giving consent, one has the legal right to understand all of the implications, health problems and  future health problems, and one has the legal capacity to say, “No.”

The dangers of microwave technology – which is used in cell phones, wi-fi, cordless telephone and other wireless mechanisms – are well known by scientists. Nevertheless, microwave emitters have been allowed to proliferate on a previously unimaginable scale.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has said it is watching the adult population until 2015, the children’s population from 2009. Barry Trower says the he WHO is watching to see how many cancers, how many illnesses, how much neurological damage occurs.

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